Preikestolen Hike, Norway: Hiking to Pulpit Rock!

by | Sep 14, 2015 | Latest Posts, Norway

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One of the most iconic hikes in Norway is Pulpit Rock, the massive rock altar which overlooks Lysebotn Fjord. Along with the Kjeragbolten hike it was one of our favourite experiences in Norway. So we’ve put together this run post to show what its like to hike Pulpit rock.

Let’s Hike!

Having decided some rest and relaxation was the order of the morning, we arrived at Preikestolen around midday and were hoping that we’d missed the worst of the crowds. The weather looked good for the afternoon ahead and we set off armed with sunscreen, water and camera gear: 2 cameras, a GoPro, selfie stick and tripods! You get the picture…we were on our way!

Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

 

Where to Stay When Visiting Pulpit Rock

Hiking Pulpit Rock is one of the must do Norway experiences, however the hike is very popular and can get very busy during peak periods. We recommend booking your accommodation well in advance and staying as close to the hike as possible to allow for an early morning or late evening hike to the summit.

  • Wathne Camping: We stayed here in a cosy cabin in Lysefjord between our hikes of Kjerag and Pulpit Rock. The cabins are spacious and very comfortable with everything you’ll need to relax and unwind after hiking. This was one of our favourite cabins in Norway. It’s a 30 minute drive to the Pulpit Rock car park from the site – Click here for best prices!
  • Hostel Ryfylke Vandrerhjem Vaulali: A good budget option if you’re looking for something basic to get some rest on your in between hikes check out this cosy hostel – Click here for best prices!
  • Lilland Hotell Apartments: A modern apartment option located in Tau close to the ferry from Stavanger with free parking. Perfect for a short stay while visiting Pulpit Rock Click here for best prices!
  • Haabakk on Sea: Another perfet apartment option located just outside Tau and less than 20 minute drive to the Pulpit Rock car park. close to the ferry from Stavanger – Click here for best prices!

 

Click here for the best places to stay at Pulpit Rock 

Renting a Car in Norway

Renting a car in Norway is the best way to explore the country. Driving conditions are really good with extremely good quality roads throughout the entire country. Having your own car gives you the flexibility to travel at your own pace through the Fjord lands and see places that are simply not possible on group tours or public transport.

We’re huge fans of road trips and have driven rental cars in over 40 countries so we have a lot of experience renting cars in foreign countries. Book your car now with RentalCars.com, where you will find the best rental car prices

Click here for the best rental car prices

 

The Pulpit Rock Hike!

Pulpit Rock is a 3.8km, two hour hike with a 330 metre elevation gain. We were hopeful it would be a walk in the park compared to the epic 600 metre Kjerag hike from the previous day! The hike began with a steep climb and then settled into a mix of relatively flat terrain with some short uphill climbs. A few years ago Norway called in the assistance of stonemasons and sherpas from Nepal to improve the path to Pulpit Rock and, as a result, the route is very manageable and it was very cool to know we were hiking along the fruits of their work.

An uphill start!
Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

The work of the stonemasons and Sherpas!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundThe route is lined with a mixture of stone paths and bridges:Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundOne of the most difficult parts of the hike is a steep incline filled with large boulders which can be tricky to navigate especially if the boulders are wet. Unfortunately we got caught in some rain showers around this time and the rocks were quite slippery but we made it up without too much trouble.Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

The Scenery!

The scenery is incredible throughout the hike and the breathtaking views are most definitely not exclusive to the top. We passed by beautiful lakes, mountain and fjord views as we made our way to Pulpit Rock.

Stunning!
Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundBeautiful!
Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundLots of places for a swim on a sunny day!
Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundDon’t look down!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundBliss!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

Pulpit Rock!

We reached the top and the amazing views took our breath away! It’s no surprise that Pulpit Rock resembles a pulpit. Well OK, it was surprise to me but the clue is most definitely in the name! The rectangular rock juts out 600 metres above Lysefjorden and the sheer drop is enough to make anyone nervous!

Legend has it that on the day 7 sisters marry 7 brothers from the Lyseford area the huge crack on Pulpit Rock will result in it separating from the mountain.  Luckily there were no group weddings the day we visited!

First glimpse!
Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

Pulpit Rock:Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

Yes it rained hailstones but we still squeezed in some Pulpit Rock poses!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

A tale of two hikers!

Despite my love of roller coasters and bungy jumps I’m a little nervous of heights so standing beside a 600 metre drop brings me to my knees. And I mean that, I was literally crawling towards the edge!  Dave is an adventurer, albeit a careful one, and took full advantage of being at the top!

Look, no hands! Chilling out on Pulpit Rock!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground My version of chilling out at the top!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundSome quiet contemplation on Pulpit:Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundI prefer the yoga pose a few metres from the edge!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

Above Pulpit Rock!

When we got to the top we made the short hike to the ledge above Pulpit Rock. The views are immense and it’s amazing to see Pulpit Rock in its entirety. We spent over an hour chilling out, taking pics, people watching and appreciating the incredible views in front of us. The sun shone, it rained, it snowed and the wind gave us a chill but all was forgiven when we looked across the stunning fjord! Bliss!

Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplaygroundSpot the tiny tent! I’m not sure I could camp so close to the edge!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

Hometime!

After a fun and view filled hour or so at the top we made our way down from Pulpit Rock. The descent was much faster than our climb and we were back to the car park in record time with a camera full of pics and a million memories of one of our favourite Norway days!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

I spy our wheels!Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

The Verdict!

Do it! Preikestolen is a beautiful hike and Pulpit Rock is amazing to see. It’s a much easier hike than Kjerag but equally rewarding and we had a blast!

PIN IT FOR LATER!

Hiking Preikestolen Norway hike Pulpit Rock ©thewholeworldisaplayground

5 Comments

  1. Tom

    Fab photos. What an experiece.

    Reply
  2. Lin K

    Do you think a bunch of 60 year olds who walk regularly for exercise but had never done any serious hiking before would be able to do the hike up to Pulpit Rock? Does the drive to the starting point of the climb involve windy roads?

    Reply
    • Elaine McArdle

      Hi Lin, I think you could do Pulpit Rock for sure! It’s a really nice hike and I didn’t find it too strenuous – as long as you’re reasonably fit I’d imagine it’s fine. If you’re coming from Stavanger (from the ferry) the drive is really straightforward and the roads were good.

      Hope you have a good trip!
      Elaine

      Reply
  3. Fred

    Hi Elaine,

    Thanks for the pix and info. We plan on the walk late June. Question I have is using a drone to record the scenery. Did anyone do it, and do you know if it is allowed. I know the general rules for drone use in Norway.

    Reply
    • David Murray

      Hi Fred, glad you liked the photos and the information. When we visited Norway drones were not very popular, so we didn’t have ours and didn’t see any. You’ll need to check the actual drone laws around this as they change constantly but as far as I know non-commercial drone flights don’t require any special permissions in Norway, provided you follow the usual rules (max flight 100m, maintain VLOS and avoid restricted areas) you should be ok. But do look up more recent information on this as each country’s drone laws change constantly.

      Reply

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